August/september 1983

Volume 34
Issue 5

Features 

“A wound in the heart is mortal,” Hippocrates said two thousand years ago. Until very recently he was right.

A HERITAGE PRESERVED
The brief mid-nineteenth-century popularity of eight-sided houses has left us a strange and delightful architectural legacy

Anonymous

In the underpinnings of our cities, in desolate swampland, beneath coastal waters—wherever the early settlers left traces of their lives—a new generation of archaeologists is uncovering a lost world

One of America’s least-known and most curious folk arts

The ground rules have changed drastically since 1789. Abigail Adams, stifled in her time, would have loved being First Lady today.

They could hardly have been more temperamentally incompatible, but the Midwestern writer Willa Cather and the crusading editor S. S. McClure enjoyed a splendid working relationship for six years and a lifetime of mutual respect

A recently discovered collection of glass-plate negatives offers a remarkable look at our grandparents

Anonymous

Using the same bold colors that drew the rubes in to see the Giant Rat of Sumatra and the Three-Headed Calf, he painted a fanciful record of his world

Anonymous

How the novelty item of 1920 became the world-straddling colossus of 1940

“I don’t want this thing often,” one soldier said of his .45 automatic pistol, “but when I do, I want it damned bad.”

Did the fifty-five statesmen meeting in Philadelphia at the Constitutional Convention know that a witch-hunt was taking place while they deliberated? Did they care?

This century’s most powerful Secretary of State talks about the strengths and weaknesses of the Foreign Service, the role of the CIA, the rights of journalists, the contrast between meddlers and statesmen—and about the continuing struggle for a coherent foreign policy