February 1962

Volume 13
Issue 2

Features 

The Cuban situation was confused, but the Marines were ready. They landed, and our first overseas base was soon well in hand

Two humble memories—a brakeman‘s and a carpenter’s—bring back the human moments of a nation’s tragedy

Packed like animals in the holds of slave ships, Negroes bound for America were prey to disease, brutal masters, and their own suicidal melancholy.

Though war with Japan was expected momentarily, and four carriers of the Imperial Navy were ominously unaccounted for, no one thought to protect our most important Pacific base from surprise attack. Why?

A remarkable group of photographs preserves the memory of a vigorous rural people—and a quite vanished world

For Mason Locke Weems, ex-parson, book salesman, and moralist, tract-writing and biography were all the same thing. George Washington’s image has yet to recover

In the era of the Bull Moose, Progressivism became a party; the man behind Roosevelt was, of all things, a Morgan partner

For a brief moment in the 1890’s, artistic posters became a cultural rage—almost a mania—in America

Fortress, ambulance, amphibious home on wheels—the humble covered wagon stands as the symbol of the winning of the West

Long before Lexington, James Otis’ fight for civil liberties gave heart to the rebel cause. But why did he behave so strangely as the Revolution neared? Which side was he on?

February 1962

Departments 

READING, WRITING, AND HISTORY