September/October 1988

Volume 39
Issue 6

Features 

To keep Upton Sinclair from becoming governor of California in 1934, his opponents invented a whole new kind of campaign

SMU isn’t playing this season; men on the team were accepting money from alumni. That’s bad, of course; but today’s game grew out of even greater scandal.

It’s never a bad thing question how well you’re doing; the problem is to find a judicious observer who is determined neither to flatter nor to condemn

For generations it was the mainspring, the proof, and the reward of a civilized social life. Now, a fond student of the ritual looks back on the golden age of the dinner party and tells you just how you should have behaved.

Forget your conventional picture of America in 1810. In the first half of the nineteenth century, we were not at all the placid, straitlaced, white-picket-fence nation we imagine ourselves to have been. By looing at the patterns of everyday life as recorded by contemporary foreign and native observers of the young republic and by asking the questions that historians don't think to ask of another time—what were people really like? how did they greet one another in the street? how did they occupy their leisure time? what did they eat?—Jakc Larking brings us a portrait of another Americna, an America that was so different from both our conception of its past life and its present-day reality as to seem a foreign country.

September/October 1988

Departments 

EDITORS’ BOOKSHELF

HISTORY HAPPENED HERE

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

THE LIFE AND TIMES

THE TIME MACHINE