Union Army

He told Lincoln he was better than any other officer on the field at Bull Run and got the Army’s top job. He built a beaten force into a proud one and stole a march on Robert E. Lee with it. He was twenty-four hours away from winning the Civil War. Then he fell apart.

They were the first black men to fight in the Civil War. They were the first to serve alongside whites. And they were the first to die.

I had long been of the opinion that this race had a right to kill rebels.” Col. James M. Read more >>

Once the South was beaten, Eastern and Western
troops of the Union army resented each other so violently that some feared for the survival of the
victorious government. Then the tension
disappeared in one happy stroke that gave the
United States its grandest pageant—and General
Sherman the proudest moment of his life.

When the Civil War sputtered out early in May 1865, there were two huge Union armies within a few days’ march of Washington, D.C. One was the Army of the Potomac, winner of the war in the East, commanded by Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade. Read more >>

Lee. Grant. Jackson. Sherman. Thomas. Yes, George Henry Thomas belongs in that company. The trouble is that he and Grant never really got along.

Of all the great commanders in the Civil War, the most consistently underrated and overlooked is Gen. George H. Thomas, the big Virginia cavalryman who fought for the Union. Read more >>

Original documents tell the story of a Civil War steamboat captains sorrowful cruise with the most destructive cargo of all

THE WAY I SEE IT

For an example of the way an incident of the distant past can put a revealing light on a problem of today, you might care to spend a moment considering the case of the Swamp Angel. Read more >>

Would the great fighter come over for the Union? Italian freedom and lead troops Lincoln hoped so

In the summer of 1861, when the newspaper generals in New York clamored for a clash of arms to put down the Confederate rebellion, the battle and the recriminations came sooner than expected. Read more >>

AN AMERICAN HERITAGE ORIGINAL DOCUMENT
Edited and with an introduction

So spoke the Union general a few minutes after he was shot in the crowded lobby of a hotel in Louisville. His killer, a fellow general and subordinate, never regretted the deed—and never paid for it

Surprised and almost overwhelmed, he stubbornly refused to admit defeat. His cool conduct saved his army and his job

The draft riots of 1863 turned a great city into a living hell.

At Fort Wagner the Negro soldier was asked to prove the worth of the “powerful black hand”

The Civil War soldier marched to his own individualist cadence, but he was much like today’s G. I.