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February 2017

The American Heritage History of World War II was first published in 1966. At the time, author and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist C.L.
Sulzberger received widespread praise for his authoritative account of the six-year war that involved more than fifty-six nations, resulted
in the death of some 22 million people, and shaped the course of history. His work became a standard reference on the war.
Stephen E. Ambrose, one of the most highly regarded historians of our time, oversaw a major revision of this classic work. Seamlessly

“In the Bosnian town of Sarajevo on the morning of June 28, 1914, a chauffeur misunderstood his instructions, made the wrong turn, tried
too late to correct his blunder, and in so doing, delivered his passengers to a point where a waiting assassin did not have to take aim to
gun them down. Two rounds from one pistol and the world rocked. The crime was the small stone that loosened brings the avalanche.”
So begins Brigadier General S.L.A. Marshall’s compelling narrative of the American Heritage History of World War I, a book that tells the

“In the Bosnian town of Sarajevo on the morning of June 28, 1914, a chauffeur misunderstood his instructions, made the wrong turn, tried
too late to correct his blunder, and in so doing, delivered his passengers to a point where a waiting assassin did not have to take aim to
gun them down. Two rounds from one pistol and the world rocked. The crime was the small stone that loosened brings the avalanche.”
So begins Brigadier General S.L.A. Marshall’s compelling narrative of the American Heritage History of World War I, a book that tells the

Drawing on a lifetime of military experience, Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall, one of our most distinguished military writers (New York
Times), delivers this unflinching history of the war that was supposed to end all wars. From the perspective of more than half a century,
Marshall examines the blunders and complacency that turned what everyone thought would be a brief campaign and an easy victory into
a relentless four-year slaughter that left ten million dead and twenty million wounded. As the war raged on, more efficient methods of

One-third of the men who signed the Declaration of Independence were not of English stock. Eight were first-generation immigrants. It
was in recognition of the mixed European background of so many Americans that John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson
proposed that the seal of the United States bear the national emblems of France, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Scotland, and England, thus
"pointing out the countries from which these States have been peopled."

In the twelfth year of Emperor Tiberius's reign, a new Roman procurator was sent to the eastern Mediterranean to govern the subject land
of Judaea. Some ten years later, he was removed from office for a misdeed and exiled to Gaul, where he may have committed suicide. The
man, Pontius Pilate, could never have imagined that his name would be forever fixed in history through a minor event of those years in
Palestine - his sentencing to death of an accused rebel, a Jew named Jesus.

No other enterprise in America's history ever approached whaling for adventure. Here, award-winning historian Edouard A. Stackpole describes the early Colonial days when boat crews attacked whales near shore through the development of deep-sea whaling by the hardy Quaker whalemen of Nantucket and on into the adventure-packed century when Yankee whalemen made the world their domain.

At the height of their power in the ninth and tenth centuries, the Vikings seemed invincible – conquering, well-armed warriors whose ships
were the ultimate in seafaring technology. From island bases near the deltas of major rivers, they used the waterways to scour the
countryside, looting and burning towns, plundering merchant shipments, and stripping churches and monasteries of their gold, silver, and
jeweled treasures.
The Norsemen eventually penetrated all of England and Scotland, founded cities in Ireland, gained a powerful province in France,

We hope you enjoyed this essay.

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