Skip to main content

For 70 years, American Heritage has been the leading magazine of U.S. history, politics, and culture. Read more >>

The magazine was forced to suspend print publication in 2013, but a group of volunteers saved the archives and relaunched it in digital form in 2017. Free subscription >>  

Please consider a donation to help us keep this American treasure alive. Support with a donation>>

Featured Articles

Here is probably the most wide-ranging look at Presidential misbehavior ever published in a magazine.

Our research reveals that 19 artworks in the U.S. Capitol honor men who were Confederate officers or officials. What many of them said, and did, is truly despicable.

Chief Justice Roger Taney made his contribution to the ideology of white supremacy when he asserted that blacks were a people apart, beyond the promise of the Declaration and the guarantees of the Constitution. 

While his brother Tecumseh was assembling the greatest Indian confederation the U.S. would ever confront, the “Prophet” launched a fateful preemptive attack in Indiana Territory.

Web Exclusive

SUPPORT THIS WEBSITE BY BUYING A NEW EBOOK!

History around the web

We nearly lost our first president to the flu. The country could have died, too, by Gillian Brockell In 1790, George Washington fell severely ill, threatening his life and the young nation he led.
Yes, Women Could Vote After The 19th Amendment — But Not All Women. Or Men, by Melissa Block Even after that milestone, millions of people — women and men alike — were still excluded from the vote, as many barriers to suffrage remained.
I’m a Historian. I See Reason to Fear—And to Hope, by Joanne Freeman We can’t assume that all will be fine in the end, but history shows us that times of unrest are opportunities, too.
The Mask Slackers of 1918, by Christine Hauser As the influenza pandemic swept across the United States in 1918 and 1919, masks took a role in political and cultural wars.
How a Lincoln-Douglass Debate Led to Historic Discovery, by Ted Mann Texting exchange by two professors led to Frederick Douglass letter on Emancipation Memorial
In 'Hamilton', Angelica Schuyler's husband is called 'not a lot of fun.' Here's his real story, by Daryl Austin While the play's creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda, has delivered Hamilton his long-overdue public acclaim, many other historical figures are overlooked or represented in a less-than-flattering manner throughout the production.

    Today in History

  • Watson and Crick found DNA

    Molecular biologists Dr. James Watson and Dr. Francis Crick identify the double helix structure of DNA. Watson, an American scientist, worked with Crick at Cambridge University in England, later releasing their discovery in Nature magazine and were later honored with the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. 

    More »

  • Operation Desert Storm ends

    Following the liberation of Kuwait City, Operation Desert Storm ends as President George H.W. Bush announces a ceasefire. Coalition ground forces entered Kuwait just 100 hours before the ceasefire was implemented, proving to be one of the shortest wars in military history.

    More »

  • Explosion aboard USS Princeton

    During a Potomac River cruise, a gun aboard the USS Princeton explodes, killing Secretary of State Abel Upshur and five others. President John Tyler was aboard the Princeton but was below deck during the explosion, which helped avoiding serious injury.