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Featured Articles

Our research reveals that 19 artworks in the U.S. Capitol honor men who were Confederate officers or officials. What many of them said, and did, is truly despicable.

Chief Justice Roger Taney made his contribution to the ideology of white supremacy when he asserted that blacks were a people apart, beyond the promise of the Declaration and the guarantees of the Constitution. 

While his brother Tecumseh was assembling the greatest Indian confederation the U.S. would ever confront, the “Prophet” launched a fateful preemptive attack in Indiana Territory.

When the leading European naturalist visited America and met with Thomas Jefferson, it had a profound impact on the young nation.

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History around the web

We nearly lost our first president to the flu. The country could have died, too, by Gillian Brockell In 1790, George Washington fell severely ill, threatening his life and the young nation he led.
Yes, Women Could Vote After The 19th Amendment — But Not All Women. Or Men, by Melissa Block Even after that milestone, millions of people — women and men alike — were still excluded from the vote, as many barriers to suffrage remained.
I’m a Historian. I See Reason to Fear—And to Hope, by Joanne Freeman We can’t assume that all will be fine in the end, but history shows us that times of unrest are opportunities, too.
The Mask Slackers of 1918, by Christine Hauser As the influenza pandemic swept across the United States in 1918 and 1919, masks took a role in political and cultural wars.
How a Lincoln-Douglass Debate Led to Historic Discovery, by Ted Mann Texting exchange by two professors led to Frederick Douglass letter on Emancipation Memorial
In 'Hamilton', Angelica Schuyler's husband is called 'not a lot of fun.' Here's his real story, by Daryl Austin While the play's creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda, has delivered Hamilton his long-overdue public acclaim, many other historical figures are overlooked or represented in a less-than-flattering manner throughout the production.

    Today in History

  • Iran Hostage Crisis ends

    The Iran Hostage Crisis ends as the 52 American hostages are released into United States custody, ending the 444-day ordeal. The previous day, American and Iranian officials agreed upon the Algiers Accord, granting the release pending the activation of Iranian assets. Incidentally, the hostages were released on the same day that Ronald Reagan is sworn into office. 

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  • FDR inaugurated

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt becomes the first President to be inaugurated on this day, as established by the Twentieth Amendment. Since Roosevelt, every President has been inaugurated on January 20 on the steps of the United States Capitol. 

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  • Battle of Millstone

    American Brigadier General Philemon Dickinson leads a force of New Jersey militia against a British foraging party at the Battle of Millstone in northern New Jersey. Also known as the Battle of Van Nest's Mill, the American victory proved the potential of American militia, which would start the 1777 Forage War between militia and British and Hessian soldiers.