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Crafting Icons Of The Past

March 2023
1min read

To achieve the appearance of age and wear that he needed for the furnishings in his houses, Mizner created his own antiques. He worked up a material called Woodbite, a composite of wood shavings and plaster of Paris, which when molded turned out uncannily authentic-looking ceilings and doors. His studios made ceramic roof and floor tiles, wrought-iron grilles and hardware, and furniture, which his workmen antiqued by scraping with broken glass or beating with chains. Some surviving examples are shown here.

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