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Tennis

How a Courtly Game Became Big Business

The gifted Australian tennis champion, Mervyn Rose, was not much in favor of vigorous training regimens, but he did once admit that during the 1950’s he enjoyed running along the bridle paths of the Bois de Boulogne in Paris. Read more >>

Introduced not quite a century ago under a name born for oblivion, the game of tennis promises to last forever

Miss Mary Ewing Outerbridge was unquestionably one of New York’s most respectable young ladies. Her Staten Island family was socially impeccable and correspondingly well-to-do; she was seen in the best places at the right times. Read more >>

In his old age, William Randolph Hearst did a stately pleasure dome decree, and yet the secret river, youth, escaped him

What with all this democracy things will never be the same

In 1936 in New York City there occured the 100th anniversary of the Union Club, oldest and most socially sacrosanct of New York’s gentlemen’s clubs. From all parts of this country and even from abroad there arrived, from lesser clubs, congratulatory messages, impressive gifts and particularly large offerings of floral tributes. Read more >>

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