Skip to main content

Offerings At The Wall

April 2023
1min read


As I read about the Vietnam War Memorial and the artifacts and small articles left at the site (February/ March), I was totally unprepared for my reaction as I wept and couldn’t stop and finally had to lay the magazine aside.

This morning I decided to finish the article, fully prepared to stanch any silly tears. I failed utterly. Why I should weep at the picture of a package of Kool cigarettes and a can of beer taped together attached to a crudely printed note is hard to explain.

It must be that the Memorial and all the mementos left there make war personal as nothing has ever done before.

We hope you enjoy our work.

Please support this 72-year tradition of trusted historical writing and the volunteers that sustain it with a donation to American Heritage.

Donate

Stories published from "May/June 1995"

Authored by: The Editors

Salvation on Sand Mountain: Snake Handling and Redemption in Southern Appalachia

Authored by: The Editors

All the Days and Nights
The Collected Stories

Authored by: The Editors

Reporting the War
The Journalistic Coverage of World War II

Authored by: The Editors

Rich Relations: The American Occupation of Britain, 1942-1945

Authored by: The Editors

Bud Powell
The Complete Blue Note and Roost Recordings

Authored by: The Editors

The Jazz Scene

Authored by: The Editors

Why Elvis?

Authored by: The Editors

Times Ain’t like They Used to Be: Early Rural & Popular American Music From Rare Original Film Masters (1928-35)

Authored by: The Editors

The Belle of Amherst

Authored by: The Editors

Day One

Featured Articles

The world’s most prominent actress risked her career by standing up to one of Hollywood’s mega-studios, proving that behind the beauty was also a very savvy businesswoman. 

Rarely has the full story been told about how a famed botanist, a pioneering female journalist, and First Lady Helen Taft battled reluctant bureaucrats to bring Japanese cherry trees to Washington. 

Often thought to have been a weak president, Carter was strong-willed in doing what he thought was right, regardless of expediency or the political fallout.

Why have thousands of U.S. banks failed over the years? The answers are in our history and politics.

In his Second Inaugural Address, Abraham Lincoln embodied leading in a time of polarization, political disagreement, and differing understandings of reality.