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Edwin S. Grosvenor

Edwin S. Grosvenor is the Editor-in-Chief of American Heritage and Invention & Technology Magazines. He is also the editor of twelve anthologies of essays that appeared in American Heritage including Men of the Revolution, HamiltonLincolnThe Civil War, The Old West  New York, World War I, Roosevelt, Churchill, and The Vietnam War, as well as anthologies from HORIZON Magazine including The Middle Ages and History's Great Confrontations.

Mr. Grosvenor co-authored a biography of his great-grandfather, Alexander Graham Bell: The Life and Times of the Inventor of the Telephone, published by Harry N. Abrams Inc., and is also the co-author of 299 Things Everyone Should Know About American History.

Previously, Mr. Grosvenor was the President and Editor of Portfolio Magazine, the highest circulation fine arts publication in the U.S. at the time according to the Audit Bureau of Circulation, and a nominee for the National Magazine Award for General Excellence. 

From 1991 to 1995, Mr. Grosvenor was the publisher of the literary magazine, Current Books, which published such authors as Norman Mailer, Bill Moyers, Garrison Keillor, David McCullough, Anne Tyler, and Vaclav Havel. Current Books was distributed in over 4,000 outlets making it one of the most widely distributed book-related publications in bookstores at the time. He also served as president and editorial director of Hotel Magazine Network, Inc., a publisher of magazines for business travelers with a total circulation of 330,000 copies distributed in the rooms of Marriott and Hyatt hotels.

The Grosvenor family founded the National Geographic Society, where Mr. Grosvenor worked as a photographer with assignments in such countries as Belize, Canada, France, Greece, Iceland, Kenya, Spain, Tonga, Turkey and the U.S.

Mr. Grosvenor also serves as the Historian of the Literary Society of Washington. He obtained his MBA and his MS (Journalism) degrees from Columbia University, and his BA from Yale University.

Twitter: @edwingro

Articles by Edwin Grosvenor

It was a challenging couple of months after the flood, but our offices will soon be operational again. Read >>
Hurricane Ida flooded our offices and caused enormous damage. Read >>
Jan Scruggs had the idea to create a memorial to honor 12 friends he lost in Vietnam, and the other 58,320 men and women who gave their lives. A petition has been started to ask Pres. Biden to award the Presidential Medal to Scruggs. Read >>
Facebook and Google have repeatedly blocked American Heritage's content because they can't tell the difference between Russian trolls and a trusted, award-winning magazine. Read >>
Here is probably the most wide-ranging look at Presidential misbehavior ever published in a magazine. Read >>
We asked ten historians in this issue to give us their assessments of Donald Trump's accomplishments, both good and bad. Read >>
Masks and "social distancing" are nothing new. Over the centuries, Americans have suffered terribly from smallpox, yellow fever, cholera, typhoid, pellagra, influenza, polio, and other pandemics. Read >>
You can now listen to a radio play of the classic story of George Bailey co-sponsored by American Heritage. Read >>
In five appointments to the Supreme Court, Eisenhower added conservatives, moderates, and a liberal, believing the President and courts should represent all the American people. Read >>
Some New England graveyards show evidence of rituals performed to ward off bloodthirsty murderers. Read >>
Our research found that the Royal Navy lost 24 warships sunk or heavily damaged in October 1780, which must have affected Britain's ability to fight in the months before the surrender at Yorktown. Read >>
Daisy Bonner, who cooked for Franklin Roosevelt for twenty years in the Georgia White House, recalled his favorite dish. Read >>
Both our Constitution and our historic monuments were trashed during recent protests. Read >>
The year 1970 was a watershed, so we asked several thoughtful writers to reflect on key events. Read >>
The Army has named ten military bases in honor of men who killed 365,000 U.S. soldiers. Should they be renamed? Or left as they are, since the bases are part of a “Great American Heritage," as President Trump says? Read >>
Our research reveals that 19 artworks in the U.S. Capitol honor men who were Confederate officers or officials. What many of them said, and did, is truly despicable. Read >>
Richard Reeves, Spring 2020 | Vol. 65, No. 2
The prolific author wrote several bestsellers about Presidential power.   Read >>
In looking at the restoration of the Front Parlor, we can learn a lot about the Washington family, life in Colonial America, and the art of historic preservation. Read >>
We researched all the colonial and state constitutions enacted before 1791 to find out what the Founding generation said about militias and the right to bear arms in these antecedent documents. Read >>
Given the recent tragic shootings, historians should play a role in providing dispassionate facts about the history of gun rights and gun control. Read >>
The Supreme Court left the door open for reasonable regulations of guns if Congress has the will to act. Read >>
Authentic brass “crickets” issued to American paratroopers on D-Day are now quite rare. A worldwide search recently “unearthed a lost piece of sound history” Read >>
David McCullough’s latest book tells the story of a small group of Revolutionary War veterans and pioneers who set out on an extraordinary 800-mile journey through the wilderness to establish the first settlement in the Ohio Territory.  Read >>
A team from American Heritage helped document some of the most important maps of the Revolution — still stored in the medieval English castle where scenes from Harry Potter were later filmed   Read >>
We will never learn from the past if we've forgotten it. Now there's been a dramatic decline in the number of college students studying history. Read >>
The famous photographs at Harvard, first published in American Heritage in 1977, are at the center of a difficult debate over who owns the images. Read >>
Completed 150 years ago this month, the railroad's construction was one of the great dramas in American history, and led to a notorious scandal. Read >>
For most of the 1800s, whites in blackface performed in widely popular minstrel shows, creating racist stereotypes that endured for more than a century. Read >>
After World War I, Army Intelligence officers collected statements from German soldiers and citizens. Read >>

"Web only stories" by this contributor

Sure, parades and picnics can be fun. But the best way to remember sacrifices made for the freedoms we cherish is to read about and remember what those heroes actually accomplished. That's an important part of what American Heritage has done for 70 years: tell those important stories. Here are some… Read more >>
It's ironic that compromise has become a dirty word for many of the same politicians who profess such reverence for the Constitution and Founding Fathers. We are a nation conceived in compromise, whose very existence was saved at least three times by deals cobbled together by politicians bitterly… Read more >>