Skip to main content

Edwin S. Grosvenor

Edwin S. Grosvenor is the Editor-in-Chief of American Heritage and Invention & Technology Magazines. He is also the editor of several recent and upcoming anthologies of essays that appeared in American Heritage including LincolnThe Civil War, Hamilton, and New York, as well as anthologies from HORIZON Magazine including The Middle Ages and History's Great Confrontations.

Mr. Grosvenor co-authored a biography of his great-grandfather, Alexander Graham Bell: The Life and Times of the Inventor of the Telephone, published by Harry N. Abrams Inc. is also the co-author of 299 Things Everyone Should Know About American History.

From 1977 to 1984, Mr. Grosvenor was the President and Editor of Portfolio Magazine, the highest circulation fine arts publication in the U.S. at the time according to the Audit Bureau of Circulation, and a nominee for the National Magazine Award for General Excellence.

From 1985 to 1990, Mr. Grosvenor served as president and editorial director of Hotel Magazine Network, Inc., a publisher of magazines for business travelers with a total circulation of 330,000 copies distributed in the rooms of Marriott and Hyatt hotels.

From 1991 to 1995, Mr. Grosvenor was the publisher of the literary magazine, Current Books, which published such authors as Norman Mailer, Bill Moyers, Garrison Keillor, David McCullough, Anne Tyler, and Vaclav Havel. Current Books was distributed in over 4,000 outlets making it one of the most widely distributed book-related publications in bookstores at the time.

The Grosvenor family founded the National Geographic Society, where Mr. Grosvenor worked as a photographer with assignments in such countries as Belize, Canada, France, Greece, Iceland, Kenya, Spain, Tonga, Turkey and the U.S.

Mr. Grosvenor obtained his MBA and his MS (Journalism) degrees from Columbia University, and his BA from Yale University.

Twitter: @edwingro

Articles by this Contributor

For most of the 1800s, whites in blackface performed in widely popular minstrel shows, creating racist stereotypes that endured for more than a century. Read >>
The famous photographs at Harvard, first published in American Heritage in 1977, are at the center of a difficult debate over who owns the images. Read >>
In looking at the restoration of the Front Parlor, we can learn a lot about the Washington family, life in Colonial America, and the art of historic preservation. Read >>
Completed 150 years ago this month, the railroad's construction was one of the great dramas in American history, and led to a notorious scandal. Read >>
Authentic brass “crickets” issued to American paratroopers on D-Day are now quite rare. A worldwide search recently “unearthed a lost piece of sound history” Read >>
David McCullough’s latest book tells the story of a small group of Revolutionary War veterans and pioneers who set out on an extraordinary 800-mile journey through the wilderness to establish the first settlement in the Ohio Territory.  Read >>
A team from American Heritage helped document some of the most important maps of the Revolution — still stored in the medieval English castle where scenes from Harry Potter were later filmed   Read >>
We will never learn from the past if we've forgotten it. Now there's been a dramatic decline in the number of college students studying history. Read >>
Given the recent tragic shootings, historians should play a role in providing dispassionate facts about the history of gun rights and gun control. Read >>
The Supreme Court left the door open for reasonable regulations of guns if Congress has the will to act. Read >>
A sad footnote to the horrific shootings in Florida is the soiling of the name of the environmental pioneer for whom the Parkland high school was named. Read >>
America’s first female soldiers were Signal Corps telephone operators making sure critical messages got through, often while threatened by artillery fire. Read >>
After the War, Army Intelligence officers collected statements from German soldiers and citizens. Read >>
When the Army arrested a chief of the Ponca Tribe in 1878 for leaving their reservation, he sued the Federal government and won — the first time courts recognized that a Native American had legal rights. Read >>
More than 600 donors chipped in to help fund the relaunch of the magazine. Read >>
We celebrate one of America's greatest historians with an anthology of his writing. Read >>
The Trump Administration has proposed massive cuts to history programs whose mission is to teach Americans what made their country great Read >>
A special issue of American Heritage offers excerpts from seven books nominated for the prestigious George Washington Prize. Read >>
Members of the Maryland Forces guard memories of a dramatic history at Fort Frederick, the best preserved fort from the former English colonies in America.  Read >>
Over 3.9 million images of the 1940 U.S. Census are now available online at the National Archives website and Archives.com Read >>
Tall ships and U.S. Navy vessels sailed into Baltimore Harbor past Fort McHenry to commemorate the bicentennial of the War of 1812 Read >>
First Medical Report on Lincoln's Assassination Uncovered Read >>

"Web only stories" by this contributor

It's ironic that compromise has become a dirty word for many of the same politicians who profess such reverence for the Constitution and Founding Fathers. We are a nation conceived in compromise, whose very existence was saved at least three times by deals cobbled together by politicians bitterly… Read more >>