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Featured Articles

Prior to Watergate, Harding's bribery ring was regarded as the greatest and most sensational scandal in the history of American politics.

Though he defended his decision as being in the nation's best interest, Ford's pardon of his predecessor may have contributed to his short-lived presidency.

Did the James Buchanan know his Secretary of War, a future Confederate general, sent 110,000 muskets to armories in the South in 1860?

Fierce debate among early political factions led to many allegations of misdeeds and abuse of power in Washington's administration, but there was no serious misconduct.

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History around the web

We nearly lost our first president to the flu. The country could have died, too, by Gillian Brockell In 1790, George Washington fell severely ill, threatening his life and the young nation he led.
Yes, Women Could Vote After The 19th Amendment — But Not All Women. Or Men, by Melissa Block Even after that milestone, millions of people — women and men alike — were still excluded from the vote, as many barriers to suffrage remained.
I’m a Historian. I See Reason to Fear—And to Hope, by Joanne Freeman We can’t assume that all will be fine in the end, but history shows us that times of unrest are opportunities, too.
The Mask Slackers of 1918, by Christine Hauser As the influenza pandemic swept across the United States in 1918 and 1919, masks took a role in political and cultural wars.
How a Lincoln-Douglass Debate Led to Historic Discovery, by Ted Mann Texting exchange by two professors led to Frederick Douglass letter on Emancipation Memorial
In 'Hamilton', Angelica Schuyler's husband is called 'not a lot of fun.' Here's his real story, by Daryl Austin While the play's creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda, has delivered Hamilton his long-overdue public acclaim, many other historical figures are overlooked or represented in a less-than-flattering manner throughout the production.

    Today in History

  • Battle of Pea Ridge

    Union General Samuel R. Curtis leads an outnumbered Federal force at the Battle of Pea Ridge in northwest Arkansas. The two-day battle, also known as the Battle of Elkhorn Tavern, confirmed Union control of Missouri and northwest Arkansas. Missouri, a strategic border state, would never again be threatened by a Confederate army.

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  • 'Bloody Sunday' in Selma

    Alabama state and local policemen attack civil rights activists with tear gas and clubs as they attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery, the state capital. The attempted march, known as "Bloody Sunday", was organized by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Vowing to reach Montgomery, the march protested both the disenfranchisement of African-Americans in central Alabama and the police shooting death of Jimmie Lee Jackson. 

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  • Bell patents the telephone

    Scottish-born inventor Alexander Graham Bell receives U.S. Patent 174465 for the telephone.