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Impeachment

What happened at the U.S. Capitol is not surprising. It's sad, disgusting and appalling, but not surprising. Read more >>
Republican senators who have conveniently forgotten the events of January 6 should be made to watch to videos of every moment of the attack on the Capitol.   Read more >>

Trump is the most transformative one-term President in 175 years, but historians will not be kind.

Distinguished historians have written twenty essays on alleged misconduct in Presidential administrations since George Washington.

In 1974, a team of other historians and I assisted the impeachment investigation of Richard Nixon by documenting “misdeeds” in each Presidential administration. Read more >>

What is this latest impeachment gambit really about? Of course, it is meant to discredit President Trump’s supporters and perhaps stop him from running for president again.

Donald Trump was impeached again, a week before leaving office, in one of the great travesties of modern politics. Read more >>

Partisan politics, plus the media’s focus on Clinton’s personal life, created a presidency under siege and consumed by scandals—some serious, others trivial.

Here is probably the most wide-ranging look at Presidential misbehavior ever published in a magazine.

In this issue 30 historians provide a detailed look at Presidential misdeeds — from inattention to “high crimes” — over the last 230 years Read more >>

Although he was scrupulously honest, Andrew Johnson angered members of Congress by thwarting their plans for Reconstruction.

The administration of Andrew Johnson, which began upon Lincoln's assassination in April, 1865, was predominantly concerned with redefining the status and rights of people, both black and white, living in the defeated Confederate states. Read more >>

Representatives objected to Tyler’s vetoes, claiming the President should be “dependent upon and responsible to” Congress.

The Whig Party came to power in 1841 behind William Henry Harrison, but Harrison died one month after assuming office. Read more >>

Congress debated a resolution to impeach Jefferson because of an appointment that Federalists thought suspicious — an early precedent that clarified Congressional roles in oversight.

The Senate convened twenty years ago to determine whether President Bill Clinton had committed "high crimes and misdemeanors"

William Jefferson Clinton, Andrew Johnson, and the judgment of history

When the 105th Congress took a pre-election recess last October, the House of Representatives had already made itself a place in the record books by resolving, for the second time in a quarter of a century and only the third in the nation’s experience, to hold hearings on the p Read more >>

In which a President fails to fulfill his constitutional duty to “take care that the laws be faithfully executed.” And a reluctant Congress acts.

EXACTLY TEN YEARS AGO this August, the thirty-seventh President of the United States, facing imminent impeachment, resigned his high office and passed out of our lives. “The system worked,” the nation exclaimed, heaving a sigh of relief. Read more >>

Was it, as Navy Secretary Welles believed, “a conspiracy to overthrow the government”?

One of the saddest tales in American history tells how a well-intentioned President lost a dazzling opportunity

An illus Read more >>

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